The Celtic Knot is a popular symbol used on Cornish jewellery and gifts. It looks beautiful, with intertwining leaves in the shape of triangle, sometimes adorned with coloured stones in the centre. But where did this stunning design originate from and what does it symbolise?

The roots of this Celtic design are a little uncertain. There have been many interpretations surrounding the knot and what it represents, with the symbol being adopted by several different groups of people.

The Celtic Knot is also known as the Trinity Knot, the Love Knot, the Triquetra, or sometimes a combination of these terms. It is thought that it first appeared in history around 450 AD, although there was little written about it at the time. The knot has been traced back to Austria during the Iron Age, when culture gradually expanded across Europe and ended in Cornwall, where it has remained. The design was used to decorate a great many artefacts, symbolising the continuity of life and the endless paths that represent eternity, never-ending love, loyalty, faith and friendship. Sometimes there is more than one interwoven pattern, which can be interpreted as a metaphor for life, where there are many roads to go down in our pursuit for love and happiness.

Christians and Pagan Celts both use the symbol in their religions. Christians believe that the tips of the intertwining triangle represent the Father, Son and Holy Spirit, whereas Pagans refer to them as the feminine powers; the Mother, Crone and Maiden.

In the modern day, the Celtic Knot is often used as a charm for luck, an offering for a calm and stable life. It is a spiritual symbol, without a beginning or an end, giving the recipient a representation of a never-ending love and wishes of longevity for their mind, body and spirit

Whatever your own belief behind the meaning of the Celtic Knot, there is no denying that the symbol is a stunning design that looks fantastic on Cornish jewellery. The idea behind it is a positive one, aspiring for a long happy life and a spirit that is eternal.

 

Sources

https://www.superjewelry.com/SearchResults.asp?Cat=1882


Post By Kimberley Roderick